Outline II

Final Analysis Outline Working Title: Activism Through BOLD Names

Thesis Statement: 

The importance of activism cannot go unnoticed as I would assert that through activism awareness, change, and acceptance are intertwined within a society and that it is activism that has pushed America forward as a whole; the power of one can become the power of many. Through Feinberg’s publications, from the originating of Coming Out Day from Eichberg, and to the NAMES Gallery itself, the force of activism is a force to be reckoned with, even today.

I. Introduction: 

Through the NAMES Project, the life and legacies of David Feinberg and Dr. Rob Eichberg were able to come to life. (a.) From a minimal panel, the legacy of David Feinberg was brought to life through his books. Through Feinberg’s novels, protest methods, and raw narratives, he is able to illustrate the harsh reality of AIDS victims. David Feinberg sheds light on the importance of activism.  (b) In addition, the legacy of Rob Eichberg is one that hits close to home. Dr. Eichberg helped establish a day of emergence, also known as National Coming Out Day. The life of David Feinberg was one devoted to raising awareness of AIDS while the life of Dr. Eichberg was used to promote the idea that being gay is nothing to be ashamed of but rather something to be embraced. While conventional methods of activism were part of Feinberg’s and Eichberg’s platform, both used methods that would involve unconventional methods of activism in order to change the narrative surrounding AIDS and the gay community.  (c). In short activism can be seen in the 20th century as a pivotal moment for movements such as HIV Awareness and LGBT outreach. Today, we see the NAMES gallery as a testament to the notion that activism still rings loud today. Not only does the NAMES Project provide a platform for activism, but keeps the legacies of the past alive.  

II. Body Structure: 

Both of my panels have an insane number of topics that I could delve into, but I am trying to focus on activism and how it changes the narrative and resulted in the attitudes we see today. I am going to break down two parts of both panels and add the NAMES Gallery itself, as my third element, to illustrate the relevance of activism today.

2.1 Feinberg 

a. His publications and how they can be seen as activism (activism through literature) 

b. Past attitudes towards AIDS   

 

2.2 Dr. Eichberg 

a. National Coming Out Day (activism and its role in the LGBT community) 

b. Attitude shifts in gay rights during the late 20th century until now (why this matters, how big an impact this has had)   

III. The NAMES Gallery

a. As wrap up my final analysis, I want to prove my purpose that activism is still alive and well today. What better way to communicate that purpose than to showcase the NAMES Gallery (Atlanta) as a method of activism itself.

b. History of NAMES, where does it come from?

c. Why was the NAMES Gallery built? (really focus on activist themes)

d. Today, look around, activism, legacies, stories, are all around YOU!

*Email Rody

 

Conclusion

I want my conclusion to focus on the panel and why the NAMES project is important in the first place.  There is much to be learned from each block in the NAMES gallery. Each quilt does not represent just a victim but tells the stories of authors, teachers, activists, and the stories of many more in their most bold form. The life of Feinberg and Dr. Eichberg were dedicated to changing the status quo with the intent of making sure that the world would be a brighter place for those who feel isolated or afraid.   

Unit 3 Preliminary Outline

This is a rough outline of components my final analysis will contain. 

Working Title: Activism Through BOLD Names

Thesis Statement: The importance of activism cannot go unnoticed as I would assert that through activism awareness, change, and acceptance are intertwined within a society and that it is activism that has pushed America forward as a whole; the power of one can become the power of many. 

Introduction: Through the NAMES Project, the life and legacies of David Feinberg and Dr. Rob Eichberg were able to come to life. From a minimal panel, the legacy of David Feinberg was brought to life through his books. Through Feinberg’s novels, protest methods, and raw narratives, he is able to illustrate the harsh reality of AIDS victims. David Feinberg sheds light on the importance of activism.  In addition, the legacy of Rob Eichberg is one that hits close to home. Dr. Eichberg helped establish a day of emergence, also known as National Coming Out Day. The life of David Feinberg was one devoted to raising awareness of AIDS while the life of Dr. Eichberg was used to promote the idea that being gay is nothing to be ashamed of but rather something to be embraced. While conventional methods of activism were part of Feinberg’s and Eichberg’s platform, both used methods that would involve unconventional methods of activism in order to change the narrative surrounding AIDS and the gay community. 

 

Body Structure: 

Both of my panels have an insane amount of topics that I could delve into, but I am trying to focus on activism and how it changes the narrative and resulted in the attitudes we see today. I am going to break down two parts of both panels. 

Feinberg 

  1. His publications and how they can be seen as activism (activism through literature) 
  2. Past attitudes towards AIDS 

 

Dr. Eichberg 

3. National Coming Out Day (activism and its role in the LGBT community) 

4. Attitude shifts in gay rights during the late 20th century until now (why this matters, how big an impact this has had) 

 

Conclusion

I want my conclusion to focus on the panel and why the NAMES project is important in the first place. 

There is much to be learned from each block in the NAMES gallery. Each quilt does not represent just a victim but tells the stories of authors, teachers, activists, and the stories of many more in their most bold form. The life of Feinberg and Dr. Eichberg were dedicated to changing the status quo with the intent of making sure that the world would be a brighter place for those who feel isolated or afraid. 

 

Make Something Project

My creation is titled “Man at the Paino Bar”. In class, we were given a bag of objects and told to make something out of what seemingly was nothing but random mini objects. However, the tiny objects all added up and with that came the opportunity to create something big out of little. From a background of paper made of a pamphlet, we decided that we could create a stick human out of the objects given. It was telling that with little googly eyes given, my first instinct was to make a human-like figure. I found that I did not want to see what other students had because I wanted to independently create something no matter what material I was given. 

I did not use objects such as the clip, and a needle. I found that once I was able to use the erasers for arms, the little plastic stick for a body, and the button and googly eyes to create a face that my creation of a human figure was set! 

In short, this project really helped me learn how to communicate an idea or description with an observer in a clear and concise way. The skill of being clear and concise is relevant to being able to articulate ideas in academic writing, which is central to our research endeavors. 

Man at the Piano Bar

 

Archives Activity

Today in the GSU Archives, we practiced working with pieces from the Women’s Gender and Sexuality Collections. Each artifact I observed held some type of significance in regards to attitudes towards AIDS and individuals with aids and illustrated the history and brought faces to the topic of AIDS. 

Taking a piece of the archives and asking questions is the first step I used to generate ideas. Once I had some questions on what each piece meant, I used a second piece of the archives to help me find clues to solve the puzzle on attitudes towards AIDS. While I could have easily done an internet search on the history of AIDS, using first-hand accounts and using primary resources to aid in illustrating my research is much more efficient, as it gives context to what can be a broad topic. 

Atrifact 1 

                            

Using news articles as helpful in gaging attitude towards AIDS. Without even reading in depth, the observer can see headlines such as “AIDS Outbreak”, “Women, Minority, and Youth at Increased Risk for AIDS”, and any other small words and phrases that paint emotions such as fear, anxiety, and discriminative and dismissive attitudes towards individuals with AIDS. 

Artifact Two 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I then found this sign that was held by this woman. It says “WOMEN DON”T GET AIDS. THEY JUST DIE FROM IT”. I find this statement to be bold and brave. The sign looks beat up, and almost like it is drying out and shriveling up. However, the message on the sign cannot go unnoticed. It challenges attitudes that at the time may have dismissed the urgency of AIDS, and forces the observer to realize people’s lives are on the line. 

The importance of metadata in the research process is vital. Using different types of sources, hearing the narratives, and seeing headlines that are all first-hand account from the time I am observing is helpful. Data doesn’t just give substance, it forces the observer to ask their own questions, analyze others positions, and seek a message to extrapolate upon. 

Bib Test

Williams, Gabrielle “Primary Source Description 2.” Post Script Reverie Blog, 2017. http://postscriptreverie.gsucreate.org/source-descriptions/primary-source-description-two-gabrielle-williams/.

Gabrielle Williams details her panel from the AIDS quilt and illustrates a thick description of the panel. Williams engages in a detailed analysis of her specific panel but she also backs it up with additional sources that were provided to the foundation of the panel maker. She seeks to accomplish an awareness of an individuals legacy. She intends her instructor and peers to see her work but also contributes to a database for the NAMES Project. Individuals doing AIDS research and family members of the memorialized would find her work to be helpful.

This source connects with my artifact by giving me insight into how to conduct quality research. The example illustrated by William gives the student a chance to see first hand how a proper primary description mixed with proper research can go a long way.

Primary Research Post

In class, we have been going over the primary and secondary sources that we will be using to conduct our research. 

The primary source we will be using is the panel itself. The panel will be used to help us conduct our primary source description. The description is going to be an in-depth analysis of what the panel represents, a description of the art method used in the panel, and the in-depth details of the life of the person and what we can draw from the panel about that person. The panel is the primary source in the sense that it was constructed first hand by people who knew Mr. Feinberg. 

I see the secondary sources as all of the other materials we are using to help us in our research endeavors. While the panel itself has a lot to discover, we also must utilize resources from places such as the GSU archives. In the archives, we can find materials such as information on HIV/AIDS, works of art from specific time periods, and many other bits and pieces that will help me understand the time period in which Mr. Feinberg lived. I find the setting of the life of Mr. Feinberg’s life to be imperative to my research. 

As time has progressed so have the ideals in which America holds. The evolution of the way we combat and treat HIV/AIDS has evolved over time. My secondary research is going to focus on literature during the 70’s and I will seek to find hints as to how attitudes and narratives were constructed concerning HIV during that time. 

PSD 1: First Contact

David Feinberg

Description and response: 

Panel 5210 has a very minimalist aesthetic. The background resembles a sheet of white notebook paper. With four lines, two pink margins on the left side, and one big piece of white material where David’s name goes; it was not a mystery that the background was resembling a piece of classic notebook paper. The panel did not have any specific borders which lead me to believe that the paper itself was almost a border for the panel. The background is made up of pure white cloth that is soft yet texturized to the touch. The panel is minimal but has a lot of significance. The word writer appears on the left and is written vertically. With the “w” and the “r” bring places in the top left-hand margin and the other letters dictating the other four lines, with each letter on a sperate line. The name “David Feinberg” is in grand capital black letters. His name is the centerpiece of the panel. Below his name is the phrases “eighty-sixed” and “spontaneous combustion”. Those phrases also appear in black but almost in a lesser shade of black than the name itself. Finally, we reach the red “A+” in the top right-hand margin. This is the only bold color on the panel. However, the A+ is significant because the red almost looks like a marker type print. The red is slightly smeared compared to the definite black color.

Going forward, I want to explore measurements of the panel and start writing my own in-depth descriptions. Roddy said that my panel does not have any letters to go along with it, but I find the minimalist nature of my panel to be significant and enjoyable. The mystery and room to think critically are going to play into my strong suit moving forward.

PSD Activity 2

Description 

The painting is a women against a black background. The women appear in the foreground. She is pale with a round face. She has her head tilted towards the right. Her lips are red and slightly spread apart. Her eyes are a dark black which contrast with her olive pale skin. The light hits her face and illuminates one side of her face while the other side is covered in shadow. However, in the midst of the shadow you can see a trickle of a silver ear ring. The ear ring is not fully visible but can be seen as the light strikes it. The ear ring illuminates the picture. She is clothes in a shawl with a blue head base and a yellow train. At the end of her shawls train the yellow  and blue mix together, forming an almost night sky moon color. Her top has a white color and is brown. 

 

Response 

Where is she looking? 

Is she standing or sitting? 

Is her top a rob or a dress? 

post

Simonette

Description 

I found that Simonette’s object was a symbol of heritage. Simonette’s object took the shape of a hand-sized plastic square. Thr plastic object was very tiny and could fit in the palm of my hand. The object was double sided and had an identical picture of a young boy on both sides. The object’s picture in the center was of a young boy dressed in red, green, yellow, white, and black. The colors appeared in stripes. The boy also had a hat on that appeared to be rather large. The hat also contained the same colors as the outfit the boy was wearing. In short, the foreground picture takes a play on the colors red, green, yellow, white, and black. The colors are sparsely scattered throughout the young boy’s outfit.

The background of the picture needs to be taken into account as well. While the background objects are not as dominant as the foreground, the background contains stars that are small and scattered above the young boys head. In the right-hand corner, you can also see a tiny red beach umbrella. The umbrella might allude to that main feature of the picture. 

The words “GuyanA” appear underlined above the main picture of the boy. Guyana is a country and this highlights the purpose of the picture. As the boy carries a flag in his hand, one might be able to infer that the picture is symbolism for patriotism.

While the plastic border and tiny frame hold the picture into place, this object is more than just plastic, this object is a tiny piece of art. 

 

The three questions I asked  Simonette where as follows-

  1. Where is your family/you from? She answered Guyana 
  2. What are the colors of the Guyanian flag? Red, yellow, green, white, and black.
  3. Have you ever gone back to Guyana? Yes, about two or maybe three years ago I went back.

In short, her answers to my questions highlighted and reaffirmed my suspicions of what the object was. While this object is obviously a tiny keychain, this practice really helped me in practicing the idea of thick description. This keychain is special because art is evident in it. The art also is a form of patriotism, which I find to be great! I suspected that is keychain represented some part of Simonette’s background but was pleased to find out more about Guyana. The fact that Guyana is in the Caribbean is what the little beach chair in the corner alludes to. Finding out about Guyana was possible through thick description observation and questioning Simonette. 

An Introduction to the NAMES Quilt

During the year 1987, the NAMES Quilt was brought to life. For one to understand the NAMES Quilt one must understand the pain that comes with NAMES. Resources, funding, and acknowledgment of an AIDS epidemic were not always seen as important as it is today.

The NAMES Quilt features patches that make a giant quilt. Each patch of the quilt, however, represents a  person who died due to AIDS. The idea of a quilt is a non-traditional memorial paying tribute to the people who are no longer here due to AIDS. 

I found it interesting that the NAMES Quilt remains the “largest community art project in the world”. The metaphor of a quilt is moving. The patches on a quilt are more than just patches, they are mothers, they are fathers, they are innocent sons and daughter. The patches on the quilt are more than just fabric; they are poets, they are teachers, they are culture. The NAMES quilt is more than just a quilt, it is a heart that still beats, it represents the never-ending legacy of people who battled with AIDS. It is a reminder to all of us that people with AIDS are just that, they are people. 

The idea of a single patch draws me in because each patch tells a story of someone, Each patch represents a name and with a mere name, we recognize that no two names hold the same story. The patches are incredibly vital and remind me that we at times dehumanize individuals who are different than us. The stigma that comes with AIDS is denied entry to the NAMES Quilt. The quilt raises a sense of humanity and gives NAMES to AIDS.